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structuresensor

Updated: itSeez3D (4.1) 3D Scanner App Review
2 months ago

Updated: itSeez3D (4.1) 3D Scanner App Review

This review has been updated for itSeez3D 4.1 on November 14th, 2016. This update adds a new subscription-based business model, improved object scanning and a new environment scanning feature. 

In Part 1 of this Review I tested the Structure Sensor—or  iSense—hardware and the apps build by the manufacturer. In this second part, I’m focussing on a third party app. While the name might sound a bit funny, itSeez3D is very powerful and polished 3D Scanning app. The iPad version is specifically designed to be used with the Structure Sensor and there’s also a Windows version designed to be used with Intel’s RealSense R200 sensor.
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Structure Sensor 3D Scanner Review
9 months ago

Structure Sensor 3D Scanner Review

If you’ve read my previous 3D Scanner Review of the 3D Systems Cubify Sense you know that I was impressed by the ease-of-use and geometric details for a device priced below €450. But the quality of the color information — or textures — the Sense captures are completely underwhelming.

In this Review I’m testing the Sense’s mobile brother, the iSense*. At least thats how 3D Systems rebranded the device. Its original name is Structure Sensor made by a Occipital. I’m testing that original version, which I got from the Dutch 3D Printing and 3D Scanning Store MakerPoint.

 

*I’ve updated this review after Occipital released new apps that make use of its new SDK. It’s greatly improves the scanner’s resolution, but drops support for the rebranded iSense device.

 

Cost-wise the Structure Sensor a bit more expensive than the Sense: The Structure Sensor itself costs €440, but you’ll need a €60 bracket to attach it to a compatible iPad. And then you’ll need a compatible iPad of course! It’s compatible with all iPads newer than the 4th Gen iPad and iPad mini 2 (previously known as “iPad Mini with Retina Display”) — including recently added support for the iPad Pro 9.7″ & 12.9″.

I’ve tested it with the least powerful compatible device, the iPad mini 2, which has a 5 megapixel camera with an aperture of f/2.4. Since this camera is used to capture color details, it’s safe to say that using a newer iPad will result in better texture quality. This iPad Pro 9.7″, for example, has a 12 megapixel camera with a faster f/2.2 lens. That being said, I think that testing with an iPad mini 2 is a great benchmark and this iPad is still being sold for €265, bringing the total minimal costs of the Sensor + Bracket + iPad to €765 — which is still a lot less than many other 3D Scanners. (All prices I mention are in Euros and include 21% Dutch VAT).

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