Image

Handheld 3D Scanners

In-depth Reviews 3D Scanning Hardware.

Artec Space Spider 3D Scanner Review
1 week ago

Artec Space Spider 3D Scanner Review

When it comes making 3D captures of objects with professional structured light scanning hardware you usually have to choose between two types of 3D scanners, depending on …
Read More

Shining 3D EinScan-Pro+ 3D Scanner Review
2 months ago

Shining 3D EinScan-Pro+ 3D Scanner Review

When I reviewed the EinScan-Pro last year I concluded that it was a good new entry in the professional handheld 3D scanner market at a competitive price of $3990 plus an optional $699 for the Color Module. Add another $699 for the Industrial Pack, and you also get an automatic turntable and tripod to use the EinScan-Pro as a desktop 3D scanner.

I liked the scan quality of both the Rapid Handheld Mode and the Fixed Tripod Mode but wasn’t convinced about the HD Handheld mode. That mode promised higher handheld scan quality with a laser scanner-like line-based projection, but it was too slow to work with professionally.

I also didn’t like the color quality of some scans, especially larger objects and people. The texture maps where very uneven and not pleasing to look at.

What I also mentioned was that back then I tested version 1.6.4. of the included software and that it needed some improvements to work well enough for professionals.

This year, Shining 3D launched the EinScan-Pro+. This Plus-model is not a replacement for the Pro but an alternative option. According to the product website it has everything the Pro has, but offers a new HD scanning mode, larger scan area and faster scanning speed. It also comes with Shining 3D’s latest scanning software version 2.5.

The complete package was provided to me by Shining 3D in return for an honest, unbiased review. I’ve used the scanner for 3 weeks on an almost daily basis before writing this review and actually learned a lot about both the hardware and the software. Many of those things also apply to the EinScan-Pro so I’ve updated that review in some points to reflect my new experiences.

 

Read More

Artec Eva 3D Scanner Review
10 months ago

Artec Eva 3D Scanner Review

In the last two years, many new 3D scanners have entered the market. From entry-level infrared depth sensors to structured light scanners aimed at professionals. For this review, I’ve been testing the Artec Eva — a handheld 3D scanner that has been around since 2012. But if you think that means it’s outdated hardware, you’re very wrong. In reality, Artec is one of the industry-standard brands of handheld 3D scanners.

The Eva is their “general-purpose” white light scanner that can be used to capture anything from the size of a shoe to that of a car with a point accuracy of up to 0,1mm. For smaller objects or very small details (up to 0.05mm accuracy), Artec offers the Space Spider blue light scanner that can also be used… in space! I’ll review that one soon (on earth, unfortunately).

The Eva is used for many purposes, from quality control to cultural heritage and from rapid prototyping to medical applications. It’s also commonly used to create assets for games and visual effects for movies and TV shows, like the Batman-inspired series Gotham. The scanner was also used to create the very first presidential portrait in 3D of Barack Obama.

My review unit came with a complementary training by Dutch Artec Reseller MiniYours / 3D Scan Solutions, which got me started quickly. I’ve been testing the Eva for about two months.

Let’s dive in!

Read More

Shining 3D Einscan-Pro 3D Scanner Review
1 year ago

Shining 3D Einscan-Pro 3D Scanner Review

Update 6 December 2016

Shining 3D announced a big update to the EinScan software that promises a lot of user experience improvements that are not reviewed below.

A few months back I reviewed the Einscan-S, an affordable (€1090) desktop 3D scanner manufactured by Shining 3D. In this post, I’ll take a look at their latest device, the Einscan-Pro, kindly supplied by the France-based 3D Printing and Scanning store Machines 3D.

As the name suggests, this new model is aimed at professionals. When it comes to structured light scanning from a tripod, the Pro is a greatly improved version of the S. But on top of that, it’s also a handheld 3D Scanner. That makes it a direct competitor to established handheld 3D scanners like the Artec EVA and Creaform Go!SCAN. But while those and similar scanners are priced in the €15,000 – €20,000+ range, the Einscan-Pro starts at a competitive €3990.

However, this base model cannot capture color out of the box. If you also want to scan textures you can get the Color Pack for an extra €600 (€700 is you buy it later). And for yet another €600, you can get the Industrial Pack, which includes a Tripod and an electric Turntable. As you can see in the header image, I’ve tested the scanner with both packs.

So it’s 3-4 times more affordable than it’s industrial competitors. That’s a great USP to have. I haven’t done in-depth tests with the EVA and Go!SCAN yet, so I’m only able to make comparisons with those based on specs. Of course, I will compare it to the Einscan-S and other scanners I’ve reviewed.

Read More

Fuel 3D Scanify – 3D Scanner Review
1 year ago

Fuel 3D Scanify – 3D Scanner Review

Update June 8, 2017
Fuel3D is discontinuing sales of the Scanify in all regions outside the US & Canada.

As part of this process they have opted to make their Professional software free to use for all SCANIFY users.

In addition, while stocks last customers in the US and Canada can get SCANIFY for a reduced rate of $799.99 + taxes, , until 11th August 2017.

It’s important to note that Fuel3D will still honour all 1-year manufacturers’ warranties on products sold by authorised distributors before 11th August 2017. In addition, Fuel3D will support the SCANIFY product until 31st December 2017.

More info and the unlock code that can be used to upgrade Fuel3D Studio to Pro can be found here.

Fuel 3D is a UK-based manufacturer of 3D capturing technologies. If you keep an eye on the 3D market like I do, you might have read that the company recently received € 1.7 million EU Horizon 2020 funding to develop a 3D capture solution for eyewear. And just last month, it announced the CryoScan3D—an enterprise-level foot scanner specifically aimed at the orthotic market.

What I’m reviewing here is their $1500 / €1200 (ex VAT) handheld 3D scanner launced in 2015—the Scanify—kindly provided to me by Beglian reseller KD85.com (thanks, Wim!).

The Scanify is an interesting product, because it’s very different from other scanners. And although it’s marketed as an allround 3D scanner, it’s only usable for a few specific purposes. But it does so in an impressive way.

Read More

Receive Monthly Updates

Blog updates delivered straight to your inbox through my monthly Newsletter...
Email address